The Value of Art

Avonport Covered Bridge, Kevin Cameron , Acrylic

Avonport Covered Bridge, Kevin Cameron , Acrylic

Create your Unique Value Proposition!

That’s what they say.

Sometimes it’s called your unique selling proposition.

How does it relate to selling your art?

A UVP is a clear statement of how you or your art will benefit the customer and how your art will ”  solve your customer’s needs and … distinguishes you from the competition.”

One of my problems with owning business jargon in relation to art is that the art can become secondary. A redefinition of what art is arises from this process.

After all, the true value of art is something difficult to measure in terms of money.  Why do some paintings cost a million dollars while other, very good art, sell for only a few hundred bucks?

This is a hard question to answer and often has more to do with current culture, investment, history, branding and so forth. Picasso, for example, is a name (brand) so tied to the art world of high dollar investment that even student copies of his work can sell for thousands of dollars.

I admit.  I am no expert but I’m not naive either. Only when it comes to junk food.

Let me put it this way:  What would be more valuable to you? Discovering an old painting in your grandmother’s attic ,which she did of you years ago, or finding a Gustav Klimt  piece?

So, the true value of some art (paintings for example) can’t be measured in dollars because it’s personal, has history,tells your story and exposes a naked truth. Value Perception must be based on real value.

I think the days of manipulating perception ( the ‘bad car salesman’ cliche ) are coming to an end. Trying to trick people into buying your art is not going to work nor will it make you a better person. Tripping over folks just to get to the almighty dollar is one of the lowest things you can do.

However you can add value to works  by being honest, for one thing. Did the work really mean something to you or were you just copying a photo, so to speak?

 Once when I had my own small home gallery, an artist suggested I mark *sold* on a few pieces just to encourage the others to sell.  I thought that was awful.  I wouldn’t want it done to me so why do it to someone else?

Honesty is one of the best ingredients in producing value.  If it (the art) means nothing to you then how will it mean something to someone else?

Be honest in your art.  Tell your story/your truth not someone else’s.

Have a creative day and thanks for stopping by!

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